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Hedging....
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Steph



Joined: 21 Apr 2007
Posts: 215
Location: Grantham, Lincolnshire

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about a mixed native hedge? Maple (sycamore), holly, hawthorn, hornbeam, cotoneaster, beech and similar. Can be pruned to keep in check. You may like to look at the Wiggly Wigglers website or catalogue. Companies like this sell young whips to plant as a hedge and as long as you keep it pruned from the beginning it becomes an interesting hedge which varies with the seasons. That will be my choice if my Leylandii hedge dies.

Steph
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes - thanks for that Steph. I have looked at this. They do them on the Buckingham Nurseries website too. Really, the more I read, the more it seems you can pretty much plant a mixture of a huge variety of trees and hedging plants (within reason) and they will all grow together to form a mixed, dense hedge which I suppose is what normally happens in the countryside. Smile

Some are suited better to being planted in winter but some you can plant at this time of year too.

There's a lot of information Here which shows that you can have a mixed native hedge and also add to it fruit trees, edible trees and many other things including the Berberis. It wouldn't perhaps look as 'formal' as some
hedges do but that wouldn't really bother us.

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Hannah x
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P. Modularis



Joined: 26 Feb 2008
Posts: 243
Location: Niedersachsen, Germany

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe I'm the only one, but I think Berberis flowers have an unpleasant smell.

Regards
Hans-Peter
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terratoonie



Joined: 22 Jun 2008
Posts: 164

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

P. Modularis wrote:
Maybe I'm the only one, but I think Berberis flowers have an unpleasant smell.

Regards
Hans-Peter




That's an interesting point, Hans-Peter. Smile

My nose is very sensitive and I'm usually the first, for instance, to say I don't like the smell of a scented candle, a perfume or a flower. But I've never noticed an unpleasant smell from the Berberis. Maybe, as with roses, there are many different types of Berberis, with many different scents.
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 8:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apologies for the lack of posting..... Embarassed .... life seems to have been horribly busy lately!

Anyway, thought I should update you all. Wink

We have been working very hard in the garden but so far it is still mostly soil and large lumps of very unattractive concrete! But there has been progress!

So far we have:

*Trimmed the tree down. This was forced on us by some strong gusts that blew two large branches down making the rest of the tree very unstable. We had to prune it for it's own good as otherwise there was a very real danger it would have toppled over. It seems to have recovered well though.

*Cleared a lot of weeds / scrub from the bottom end of the garden and cleared most of the rest of the garden. Though the weeding goes on and on, of course!

*Concreted in some posts and put up screening on the right-hand side to cover the gap in the not-so-nice neighbours fence.

*Concreted in some posts at the bottom end of the garden and added some high trellis.

We plan to:

*Plant a hedge using mostly native species such as hawthorn, quickthorn, dogrose etc down the right hand side of the garden. We're going to do this October / November as lots of gardening sites say it is best to do it when the plants are dormant and we'll get a much better selection of plants to choose from at this time of year too. It will probably include some holly for some evergreen growth too.

*Plant pyracantha up the trellis at the back - which will give us some much-needed privacy and will provide extra security at the same time as hopefully providing a haven for birds / insects etc. We'll need to clear out the soil first as it's mostly gravel and yucky stuff so it will have to bulked up with good quality peat free compost first before anything will grow there!

*Plant a couple of apple trees (dwarf trees) and a small wildlife flower patch at the bottom of the garden (this area all needs clearing first as it's mostly gravel-covered at the moment)

*Transplant our potted Hornbeam tree to the bottom of the garden (no idea how it ended up in our garden in a pot but my beloved doesn't know either and he lived here a long time before me - it's alive anyway - but in very great need of a transfer!)

*Have a small pond at the bottom of the garden. We've seen a moulded base one that is a dinky size that should be very manageable but it should benefit wildlife etc at the same time.

*Plant a Hazel bush at the top of the garden

*Add flowery plants eventually on the left border (but this may need to wait as we may put more screening above the fence to give us more privacy)

I would also love to put in a crab apple tree but am concerned that it will be too squashed as they aren't that small and our garden isn't that big. I've been doing a *lot* of research on apple trees and the M9 rootstocks seem to be the best option for our garden as they wont get silly-big but will still provide blossom and fruit. Not sure as to whether they will be planted out or put in large containers yet. I'd like a small veg / fruit patch somewhere but no idea where yet!

We may also get a shed that I can use for potting things in and for tools and storage for the bottom end of the garden - we have a perfect 7ft x 5ft paved area where it could go very easily. I'd like a small greenhouse too -even if it's only one of those plastic-y type ones.

I do have some pics - will upload them soon so you can see the garden in it's barest and most hideous state! Embarassed

The more soil we dug out for posts etc the more lumps of concrete we seemed to find! Confused We will get rid of it all eventually but as it's horrendously heavy it will take some time and thought to dispose of it. In it's current form we couldn't even manage to get it into a skip!! Shocked

We can't wait to get to the stage when we can actually put PLANTS and GREEN things in there instead of sand and cement!! Razz

Will get pics up a.s.a.p.

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Hannah x
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terratoonie



Joined: 22 Jun 2008
Posts: 164

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 9:30 pm    Post subject: hard work will be rewarded ! Reply with quote



Wow, Hannah. Shocked You've been very busy. Very Happy

A neighbour of mine has pyracantha up the front of her house which has been there probably about 20 years. The birds love it, and there are various nests hidden behind it's branches every year, which cats can't reach Twisted Evil

Looking forward to your photos. Very Happy

Thanks for so much information. Very Happy Very interesting. Very Happy Thumbs up

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All best wishes from terratoonie.

Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't ! - Eleanor Roosevelt
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks tt! Smile

Well, here's the pics- there's quite a few! I know it looks awful but please bear in mind that it's a work in progress and that we've done no actual 'beautifying' yet; just structural things and weeding etc.

This is the right hand side before we put the screening up (you can see the gap in the panels) :





This is the left hand side of the garden before we put trellis at the back:





Right hand side with screening in place: (We plan to paint the fence panels that are left and also give the screening itself a coat so that it ties it all together a bit more, plus we have to fill the holes in a lot more and bank it up underneath the screening) The soily bit in front of the tree is where we're putting a hedge in.







The trellis at the bottom of the garden: (yes, the hideous rusty metal thing will be got rid a.s.a.p! Embarassed )





View of whole bottom section of garden:



Paved bit near house:



You can't see the bit behind and to the left of the tree very well but there's quite a lot of soil and garden there where we plan to put apple trees etc in. I'm not sure yet where everything will go.

(Does anyone know what sort of tree it is in our garden?! Razz )

Hopefully I'll be able to update these pics with something nicer soon!

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Hannah x
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terratoonie



Joined: 22 Jun 2008
Posts: 164

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:24 am    Post subject: Fascinating photos Reply with quote



Fascinating photos, Hannah. Very Happy

The work putting in those lengths of trellis will be well-rewarded. Lots of places for plants to climb and wind their way upwards

In my garden, the little birds like to perch in lower 'squares' of the trellis which are too small for the larger birds.

I expect you're finding the birds like landing on your trellis,too. Very Happy

Which birds seem particularly interested in your garden at the moment?

Often, when there's a lot of building work going on, it scares away some types of bird, but brings in others which know they can get easy access to worms. etc. where the soil has been freshly dug.

Keep up the good work, and please keep posting progress.

It's really interesting. Very Happy

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All best wishes from terratoonie.

Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't ! - Eleanor Roosevelt
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks - it was a lot of work but we're really pleased with it so far.

The birds keep coming but at this time of year I think they 'shop elsewhere' as berries etc are so abundant so we don't see as many. No doubt in another month or so they'll all be coming back, lol.

It's mostly starlings, blackbirds, greenfinches, goldfinches, collared doves, mistles thrushes, some wood pigeons and lots and lots of sparrows of course! Hopefully we'll get a bigger diversity of birdlife as we get plants etc into the garden. Smile

I've been reading the other thread about plants and the butterfly list so will try to incorporate some of those into our plans too!

The biggest problem is quite simply finding enough hours in the day to do it all...... but we're chipping away at it and will continue to do so.

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Hannah x
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just an update to this thread for anyone interested! Wink

We ordered our hedging plants from Buckingham Nurseries in the end - for anyone thinking of buying hedging plants I would certainly highly recommend them! Service was excellent all round and they were really friendly!

The plants came today! They are fantastic, packaging was amazing and the roots on them are incredible. They all look really healthy.

We could have picked a warmer day to plant a hedge in our garden .... Rolling Eyes .... but at least it was dry and fortunately the trench had been dug before the ground froze over!

We've incorporated loads of compost (peat free of course!) and manure and we also used some 'Rootgrow' which is supposed to help their root system develop.

The hedge consists of:

2 Cotoneaster simonsii 18-24ins
20 Quickthorn 2-3ft transplanted (Hawthorn)
8 Holly, Green female 12-18ins pot grown
2 Holly, Green male 12-18ins pot grown
2 Rose, Dog 2-3ft (Rosa canina)
2 Spindle 2-3ft Tr (Euonymus europaeus)
2 Rose, Sweet Briar 2-3ft (R. Rubiginosa)
2 Blackthorn 2-3ft (Prunus spinosa)transplants
2 Buckthorn, Common 2-3ft (Rhamnus cathartica)

.... so it's mostly hawthorn with other plants for variety in flowers and berries and just for added interest all round really! Very Happy

The holly is to give the hedge an evergreen aspect as apart from the Cotoneaster, the rest of the plants are deciduous. I will post pics soon.

We've also planted a small weeping spring cherry tree, a small weeping crab apple tree (can't remember variety off-hamd!), a family apple tree (Cox, Gala and Bountiful on one tree) and another slightly larger crab apple tree (Red Sentinel). So we're getting there!

Lots of tidying up to do and finishing off but it's looking more like a garden and has a real feel of structure to it. Oh and we've planted Pyracantha plants up the trellis too though they're not that big yet!

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Hannah x
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Dawn



Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 2165
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Hannah, sounds like you've been really busy, I'd love to see some more photos when you're able to take some. Are your hands ripped to shreds with the thorny plants you put in??

I'm going to look up Spindle, as this is the second time in two days I've heard of them, our local council is giving away free trees, and Spindle are one of the choices, but I have never heard of this tree/shrub before.

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Dawn

I can confirm - Bitterns DO exist, and they are brilliant!!!!
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Dawn. Will get some photos up soon - it's a bit snowy at the moment to see anything much! The birds are going crazy over the food out for them though, bless 'em in this cold weather! Razz

There's a link to the Spindle plant here. I remember when I was at Primary School going on a Nature Walk thing and we came across a Spindle tree and even now I can remember how fascinated I was at how beautiful and delicate the flowers were. So I jumped at the chance to include a couple in our hedge! Very Happy

I'm not that old, lol, so it's not *that* long ago but must be at least 20 years so you can tell it quite an effect on me at the time.

It all looks, well, not that great yet but when things have grown it will be lovely. Am really looking forward to seeing everything grow and develop.

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Hannah x
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Tricia



Joined: 08 Apr 2005
Posts: 3579
Location: Surrey

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah thanks Hannah - I've seen Spindles without knowing what they were - so it's great to have them identified at long last!
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Tricia
What is this life if full of care, We have no time to stand and stare?

http://belfiebird.blogspot.com/
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davevikingr



Joined: 18 Aug 2008
Posts: 97
Location: Ryedale, North Yorkshire

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see you're well on with your garden now - so just a couple ofn thoughts.

1 - Native hedges are a great idea but hornbeam is possibly not native in Derbyshire, sycamore is non-native although Field Maple is and cotoneaster is only naturalised not native (although very good for wildlife as a shelter and possible nesting site). Look for a local plant database for Derbyshire. There is also a plant postcode database somewhere on the internet that will tell what is native.

2 - For a quick and evergreen hedge try cheating - plant evergreen climbers on trellising - some ivies are pretty quick and you can always add some non-evergreen flowering climbers among them to add colour. NB - Look at the final size of the climber before buying !!!
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Hanlou



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 28
Location: Derbyshire

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have any hornbeam or sycamore in my hedge..... Razz

I know it's not all native - just the vast majority. I'm *fairly* sure that Holly's not native at all but we included it to add some prickly (security factor) and also berry-filled evergreen growth to the hedge. Smile

We have already planted pyracantha all along the bottom of the garden up trellis..... I don't like Ivy, it tends to take over and I don't feel it has as many wildlife benefits as Pyracantha.

I feel it's all a rather huge improvement on conifers whichever way you look at it. Wink

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Hannah x
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